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Cooking Classes

 

About the Classes

Learn to cook with Eugenio Rossi .

At the Scoglio you will find a haven where good, honest, traditional food is still honored

The school is a light-hearted look at pizza - after all it's an Institution in Italy. We cover all aspects of pizza:

How to make it - both commercially and in a domestic oven .

The social influences of pizza

The various traditions and flavours associated with regions.

cooking pizzas

The History of the pizza, which recently celebrated its 100th birthday

An explanation of why the best pizza is not the most 'acrobatic' and much, much more

Or if you are interested in Pasta, we offer a pasta course as well!

All About our Pizzas

All scholars will receive a certificate to demonstrate that they have attended one of our pizza schools. Why do we do this? We know that for many visitors to Italy a pizza is a must. After all it's the home of pizza and as its so associated with out country itys far to say that a bad pizza damages the image of Italy! There exist so many misunderstandings regarding this important subject that we would like to make clear how to preparate the best pizza. We can provide you with all the necessary small details which are essential to preparing the perfect pizza.

The difference between a good pizza and terrible pizza is huge. The noted gourmet journalist Dott. Aurelio Guglielmo is at you disponal for any questions on this subject along with the highest qualified experts from Tramonti. By the end of the seminar you will also get more out of your pizza experience from fragrance to taste.

Join the fun, learn about our traditions, improve your own pizzas - especially if you are preparing them commercially overseas, and enjoy a wonderful pizza at the end of the event.

The Restaurant

What makes a Good Restaurant become a Great Restaurant - Tradition ?

Scoglio is now in its third generation in Rome having first opened in 1928. In fact the original Scoglio was founded by the Rossi family in Naples in 1870.

an old photo of the restaurant

In the span of three generations much as changed in Italy, economic collapse, war, a return to democracy, a resurgent and economically strong Italy, a rediscovery of the greatness of Italian culture and genius in art, design, science, industry, business, finance and fashion. But throughout these changing times the Scoglio, has maintained those standards and traditions which have made it one of the very best Neapolitan restaurants in the world.

Quality and freshness of ingredients, imaginative cooking, a love of food and a generosity of spirit which all the world associates with Italy. Fashions change - quality does not. The Scoglio has been adapting but never changing. Fittingly, Mediterranean food actually rides the waves of changing fashions. But one fashion which never influenced the Scoglio is "Nouvelle Cousine" - when food is this good we know our customers want generous portions - it's the Italian tradition.

One other bastion of our tradition is the décor - founded the 20's we proudly maintain the contemporary Art-Decò - from the furniture to the staff uniform we still respect the fashion of that period. We also recall the seaside atmosphere with many hand painted oleo-graphics on the walls.

the dining room

This trattoria, a longtime favorite, offers a great introduction to the Neapolitan kitchen. Here you can taste a genuine plate-size Neapolitan pizza (crunchy, oozy, and excellent) with clams and mussels. Or, you can start with a medley of savory stuffed vegetables and antipasti before moving on to chicken cacciatore or well-flavored tender veal scaloppini. Scoglio di Frisio also makes for an inexpensive night of hokey but still charming entertainment, as cornball "O Sole Mio" renditions and other Neapolitan songs issue forth from a guitar, mandolin, and strolling tenor. The nautical decor (in honor of the top-notch fish dishes) is complete with a high-ceiling grotto of fishing nets, crustaceans, and a miniature three-masted schooner.

Reviews

Eugenio:  I would like to thank you for your hospitality and words of wisdom on food preparation during our stay inRome last week.  You have inspired us and we are very excited about making our own pizzas with authentic ingredients.  I was able to find the “00” flour - made by “Caputo” and imported from Italy.  We planted ourtomatoes in the garden and we are looking forward to making great pizzas.  We don’t use the metric system but I was able to go to the store and by a conversion measuring device so we can experiment with the various ingredients.

We really enjoyed learning the techniques  - the lunch and the wine were very good!!   - Thank you again!! R&B

What is a good pizza?

All "scholars" will receive a certificate to demonstrate that they have attended one of our pizza schools. Why do we do this? We know that for many visitors to Italy a pizza is a must. After all it's the home of pizza and as its so associated with out country its fair to say that a bad pizza damages the image of Italy! There exist so many misunderstandings regarding this important subject that we would like to make clear how to preparate the best pizza. We can provide you with all the necessary small details which are essential to preparing the perfect pizza.

The difference between a good pizza and terrible pizza is huge. The noted gourmet journalist Dott. Aurelio Guglielmo is at you disponal for any questions on this subject along with the highest qualified experts from Tramonti. By the end of the seminar you will also get more out of your pizza experience from "fragrance to taste".

The Roman Diet

Rome has been a melting pot for foods from other places since the Roman Legions begancollecting recipes and provisions, and, in some cases, cooks, from the far reaches of the empire.

La cucina romana provides some of the most flavorful foods of Italy. Memorable meals in the region of Latium begin with arrays of antipasti that alone would make feasts: plattersof frutti di mare, anchovies, sardines, tuna, fried shrimp, prosciutto, salame, olives, mushrooms, pickles, sun-dried tomatoes, sweet-sour onions, peas and beans with pork, pizze, focacce, canapés, vegetable tarts, frittate with potatoes and onions, stuffed eggplants,peppers and tomatoes, croquettes of rice, vegetables or meats, breads grilled and flavored with garlic and oil as bruschetta or sliced and topped with meat and vegetable pastes or cheeses as crostini.

Gardeners raise the tastiest of peas, zucchini and fava beans, specialize in artichokes tender enough to eat raw, or to fry in the style of Rome's Jewish ghetto as carciofi alla giudia. The region's own species of rucola (rocket) and the wild ruchetta make splendid salads, as do puntarelle, spear-like endive dressed with raw garlic and anchovies.

The hills of northern Latium are noted for extra virgin olive oils, protected under the DOPs of Canino and Sabina.

Roman menus feature spaghetti alla carbonara and bucatini all'amatriciana, as well as tubes of rigatoni and penne. Fresh pasta may be flat as lasagne, rolled as cannelloni or cut in strips as the celebrated fettuccine al burro, often identified with a restaurant called Alfredo. Gnocchi from potatoes or durum wheat semolino are also popular around the region, as are polenta and rice.

Seafood plays a role in the daily diet, with mussels, clams, shrimp, squid, cuttlefish and palombo shark fresh from the ports of Fiumicino and Anzio, alongside the indispensable baccalà. Also to be found are large prawns called mazzancolle and gamberi,sea bass called spigola, as well as imported oysters and lobsters.

Romans adore abbacchio, milk-fed lamb roasted for Easter feasts though delicious year-round. They also eat their share of beef and veal, whose prime cuts were traditionally reserved for the bourgeosie and whose other parts, tripe, brains, entrails, liver, heart, even feet and tails, went into the zestful dishes of the common people. Pork is prized as porchetta, roasted by butchers in the Castelli Romani and sliced warm for sandwiches at the city's street markets. Many recipes rely on guanciale, salt pork from the jowl, though the traditional lard has been steadily replaced as a cooking fat by olive oil from the Sabine hills. The rustic country bread of Genzano in the Castelli Romanirates an IGP.

Pecorino Romano DOP prevails among cheeses. Latium alsomakes the fresh buffalo milk cheese that qualifies under the Mozzarelladi Bufala Campana DOP, centered in Campania, the similar provaturaand tasty young marzolino from the milk of sheep or goats. Ricottamay be eaten fresh or salted and dried for grating.

Rome is noted for gelato, lenten raisin buns called maritozzi, cream-filled pastries called bignè, rum-soaked fruit and nut cake called pan giallo and a custard cake drenched with syrupy liqueurs known as zuppa inglese. The city's coffee bars are famous for espresso from freshly roasted beans. Meals oftenend with a glass of sweet sambuca liqueur, sipped with three coffee beans to munch on.

White wines dominate Latium's production, whose 23 DOCs are led by the versatile Frascati and Marino from the Castelli Romani and the mythical Est! Est!! Est!!! from Montefiascone to the north. Yet some of the finest wines are reds of Cerveteri, Velletri, a trio from the Cesanese vine or unclassified bottlesbased on Cabernet and Merlot.

Food Menu for Inspiration

Appetizers

Fried baccala (stockfish)
Mozzarella of buffalo
Finocchiona (Tuscan salame)
Focaccia (flat bread) with seasonings
Roast peppers
Eggplant filled with mozzarella and bread crumbs
Friarelli - pan-tossed small green peppers
Assorted vegetables in a pasta crust
Fried ricotta
Ricotta with speck,
Bruschetta on unsalted bread
Small pizzas with tomato and basil
Crochettes of chick-peas
Crochettes of octopus
Poached octopus
Serving of chicory, fresh tomato and shrimp, or mushrooms
Seafood salad
Mussels alla diavola
Oysters and champagne
Sauteed seafood
Mussels in piquant sauce
Shrimp in Leone sauce
Fish au naturel Pugliese style in extra-virgin olive oil
and Mediterranean
spices
Occhi di canna (small fried squid with balsamic
vinegar e celery stalks)

Pasta Selections
Paccheri - special pasta cut on a bronze die with mussels,
cheese and pepper
Linguini with pesto or with squid
Giant "pens" with octopus
Mafalde (rippled broad noodles) with sea-scorpion
Timbale of zitti with vegetables
Timbale of pappardelle (broad noodles) in beef ragu
Lasagna with clams and provola (cheese)
Rice Saraceno with fish ragu
Spaghetti with pesto
Spaghetti with wild fennel, bottarga (?), fresh garlic and celery

 

Soups
Pasta with beans, pasta with chick-peas, pasta with lentils
Pasta with broccoli, farro soup, soup with onions and peas
Fish soup Naples style,
Rice and celery, rice with chicory
Polenta with onion

Entrees
Saltimbocca alla Roma (veal seasoned with sage
Chicken with peppers
Veal with rucola
Roast breast of veal
Ossobuco
Selection of grilled meat dishes
Roast rombo with potatoes
Salted ricciole (sea urchins) di mare
Stuffed squid
Large shrimp pan-tossed with garlic and tomato
Swordfish alla Siciliana
Roasted scampi
Pescatrice au gratin
Live grilled seppie (cuttle fish
Cuttle fish with olives
Sole alla mujgnaia,
Roast cernia with rosemary and spicy peppers,
Sea bass in brine
Stuffed beef roll with celery
Pounded veal with lemon
Veal cutlet all parmigiana
Veal cutlet alla Bolognese
Veal scallop alla Frisio with mozzarella and peas
Veal scallop with mushrooms and wild greens
Beefsteak in pieces with Aglianico red wine
Pan-tossed pieces of beef or fish with piquant, aromatic herbs
Pre-salted carpaccio marinated with apple vinegar and fresh fennel

Desserts

Select from four types
Baba au Rhum, tiramisu.
Lemon or orange sherbet, ice cream (4 flavors)
Lemon dessert
Neapolitan pastries
Strawberry, lemon or coffee mousse
Sacher chocolate cake
Fresh fruit of the season
Sicilian "cannoli"

 

Details

Gourmet Walking Tours

Gourmet Tour
Food Secrets

Zig zagging through the winding streets join one of our private gourmet food tours and discover unique gourmet shops and purveyors of Roman specialities.

More Details

 

rome kitchen

Cooking Classes in Rome for Beginners or Professionals

An eating experience is a return to our to youth when food was natural and the marketing men didn't tell us what to eat - we knew what to eat because it was good.

We also knew how to prepare it and enjoy it. This knowledge is gradually diminishing but at the Scoglio you will find a haven where good, honest, traditional food has benn honored since 1928.

Duration: 4 hr
When: 10am - 2pm Afternoons on request - 2:30 - 6:30pm
Min 2 people

 

an arrowInquiry Form
paris car tours

Learn to make Pizzas

Join the fun, learn about our traditions, improve your own pizzas - especially if you are preparing them commercially overseas, and enjoy a wonderful pizza at the end of the event.

more details

160€pp

a freshly cooked pizza 9:30-10:00 am Arrival at the Restaurant and introduction to the Master “Pizzaiolo”.
Introduction to the story of the pizza

Explanation of the differences between various types of ovens, their construction and characteristics.

Explanation of the importance of the various qualities of flour and their origins.

Demonstration of the preparation of the dough.

Everyone rolls their own pizza.

Cooking and tasting of the pizzas prepared by the class participants.

12:30 pm Luncheon of an appetizer (the class decides) and various pizzas “al metro” (by the meter) 30 cm. x 60 cm. Followed by a brief discussion on various drinks to accompany a pizza.

2:00 pm Conclusion of the course and presentation of a diploma of the restaurant attesting to participation in the seminar.

Pasta Making

Learn to prepare Pasta

Chef Rossi presents a brief introduction on the traditions of the Italian Mediterranean kitchen and historic-social evolutions. Instruction on the preparation of hand-made “pasta all‘uovo,” and two types of sauces.

more details

160€pp

 

plate of pasta 9:30-10:00amEugenio presents a brief historical-cultural introduction on the traditions of the Italian Mediterranean kitchen and historic-social evolutions. Instruction on the preparation of hand-made “pasta all‘uovo,” and two types of sauces.

12:30 pm Lunch and discussion(upon request) on the production and characteristics of wines from Lazio.

2:00 pm Conclusion of the course and presentation of a diploma of the restaurant attesting to participation in the seminar

Professional Chef

Capriccio

Chef Rossi takes you to the market and then teaches you to cook in his restaurant's professional kitchen.

more details

185€pp

8:30-9:00 am Hotel pickup.

Transfer to Rome's historic market - Testaccio. One hour tour of the marketplace.

Return to the Restaurant for a hands-on cooking class.

Prepare two first dishes and two second dishes.

Prices Include :

Cooking instruction, supplies. and the lunch you have made. For every participant a diploma, a souvenir of a personalized cotton apron and a cap (or hat).

(Drinks excluded.)

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We will respond within 48h

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